International Journal of Literary Linguistics

The International Journal of Literary Linguistics (IJLL) is an open-access, peer-review journal published by Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz (Germany) that is dedicated to the publication of original research at the interface of literary studies and linguistics. The journal provides an innovative forum for articles participating in the recent reshaping of the field of literary linguistics under the influence of pragmatics, functional linguistics and cognitive studies. It aims at contributing to a new, dialogic understanding of literary production and reception. The journal invites contributions from scholars working on different languages and literatures.

Submissions to the journal may be concerned with (but are not restricted to) the following topics: Textuality, intertextuality, dialogism, narratology, stylistics, genre, in spoken, written and multimodal texts (and in their adaptations into other media). We are also interested in publishing special issues edited by guest editors as well as reviews of scholarly books of relevance.

Publication language is English.

The work of the editorial team is supported by an advisory board comprising some of the most eminent scholars in the field of literary linguistics.

If you are interested in submitting an article, please go to the About the Journal page to find out more.


Vol 5, No 2 (2016): Approaches to Fictional Dialogue

Edited by Aino Koivisto and Elise Nykänen (University of Helsinki)

This special issue is devoted to a cross-disciplinary investigation of a specific literary phenomenon, fictional dialogue. Fictional dialogue is used to refer to passages of character-character conversation within a literary text. More specifically, the articles of the issue deal with fictional dialogue as a narrative mode in prose fiction. The issue aims to engender an appreciation and a better understanding of the workings of dialogue by drawing on the insights and methods from both literary studies and linguistics. These methods include a rhetorical-ethical approach to narrative, cognitive and “natural” narratology, the study of everyday conversational storytelling, and Conversation Analysis (CA). Combining these methods helps us to understand that while dialogue is a central means to depict character-character relationships it also serves other levels of communication in a narrative and thus contributes to the reader's comprehension of the narrative design's rhetorical and ethical dimensions. The articles also suggest that while understanding dialogue depends partly on the reader’s experiences of real-life conversation, the interpretation of dialogue is determined by the overall design of a literary text and the historically changing conventions.

Table of Contents

Special Issue

Aino Koivisto, Elise Nykänen
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Laura Karttunen
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Jarmila Mildorf
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Aino Koivisto, Elise Nykänen
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